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New resource added to CPPN

0 July 27, 2016

We’ve added a new resource to the list of PGx websites for pharmacists. ARUP and the University of Utah have shared a CME video lecture about PGx. See this new web-resource and all others by clicking HERE.   Have you come across any helpful resources you think we should add to our list? Please email the website development team at communitypharmpgx@gmail.com

Posted in Uncategorized by Rachel Mills
0 July 26, 2016

Researchers from the UK have published a new review of the economic impacts of pharmacogenetic testing in August’s issue of Pharmacoeconomics. In this paper entitled “A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluations of Pharmacogenetic Testing for Prevention of Adverse Drug Reactions,” a systematic literature review identified evidence of the cost-effectiveness of pharmacogenetic testing prior to initiation of treatment. Plumpton and her co-authors examined the findings of 47 articles that described economic evaluations of PGx tests. These articles demonstrated evidence that PGx testing for HLA-B*57:01 for abacavir, HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-A*31:01 for carbamazepine, HLA-B*58:01 for allopurinol and CYP2C19 for clopidogrel are cost-effective. To read more, access this publication here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26984520 In another paper electronically published earlier this month, Marika Plöthner and her colleagues at Leibniz University Hannover published a similar review to identify cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of pharmacogenetic tests. By conducting a systematic literature review, 27 studies that explored cost-effectiveness were identified and assessed using the “Quality of Health Economic Studies” instrument. As with Plumpton et al, cost-effectivene

Posted in Uncategorized by Rachel Mills
0 July 22, 2016

There are a number of laboratories conducting PGx testing, and it seems for every lab there’s a different way of describing the same test result. This  lack of standardized language contributes to confusion and can make integration of test results into electronic health records very difficult. To curb this, the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC)  has developed recommended language by identifying common terms using a review of by laboratories’ test reports and surveying experts in the field. Published online this week in Genetics In Medicine, this report on the standardization of pharmacogenetics terms is anticipated to improve understanding and interpretation of testing and facilitate data sharing across health records. You can read the recent publication in its entirety here: http://www.nature.com/gim/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/gim201687a.html

Posted in Uncategorized by Rachel Mills
0 May 13, 2016

We have recently updated our list of laboratories offering pharmacogenetic testing. Please visit the RXPGX Labs page to see a list of labs that we’ve identified as offering pharmacogenetic testing.

Posted in Uncategorized by Rachel Mills
0 January 4, 2016

We have a new pharmacogenetic testing resource and we’d like your feedback! We have developed a patient-education video about pharmacogenetic testing that we’d like to add to the CPPN resource list. But first we need feedback from potential users so that we can ensure that we have created an exceptional resource that pharmacists and other providers like you will find helpful and useful. We’ve prepared a survey that will take about 15 to 20 minutes to complete. We’ll show you the 5-minute video, then ask you a few questions about it, and give you the opportunity to write in any additional comments or thoughts you may have about ways to improve the video. To access the survey, click here or copy and paste this link into your internet browser: https://uncg.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_7PuN46zEvb4aC21 Please feel free to share with any colleagues!

Posted in Uncategorized by Rachel Mills
0 October 27, 2015

Nature published a really nice review paper from researchers at St Judes. The review covers the evolution of pharmacogenomic discovery, the development of diagnostic testing, and the implementation of pharmacogenomics in the clinical setting. This publication provides a useful overview of pharmacogenomic testing and may be interesting to anyone who wants to know more about using testing in a clinical setting. Authors Relling and Evans predict:

“Going forward, there is a growing body of evidence to suggest that pharmacogenomics will become an important component of evidence-based precision medicine.”

You can read the review in its entirety at Nature.com

Posted in Uncategorized by Rachel Mills
0 October 15, 2015

A recent piece published by The Atlantic accounts a rare condition, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) that is caused by a hypersensitive reaction to medications, most often carbamazepine and allopurinol. This reaction is due in part to changes in the HLA genes, namely a variant called HLA-B*15:02 and may be avoided by having a pharmacogenetic test. For individuals with the HLA-B*15:02 variant, doctors can prescribe an alternate drug and avoid the onset of SJS. This testing was so effective in reducing the number of SJS cases that the national health insurance of Taiwan began covering the cost of the genetic testing and some providers are distributing a “pharmacogenomic wallet card” which appears to be helping further reduce the occurrence of SJS. You can read more about the history of SJS in Taiwan and their wallet card here. Similarly, we have provided research participants who undergo pharmacogenetic testing a wallet card. Many of the participants found the wallet card to be helpful and some reported sharing it with other providers. You can see the wallet card we used in our Resources site. If you’d like to know more about our wallet card or get the template to cr

Posted in Uncategorized by Rachel Mills
0 September 24, 2015

recent article from Scientific American details the risks many patients, particularly older patients, face when taking multiple prescription medications. RXPGX creator, Dr. Susanne Haga, was interviewed for this piece and she describes the potential of using pharmacogenetic information to inform treatment and potentially decrease risks of polypharmacy. She also discusses rxpgx.com as a useful reasource for community pharmacists. In the article, author Jessica Wapner acknowledges that as patients take more medications, their risk for drug interaction and side effects increase. In addition to pharmacogenetic testing, she discusses other methods to identify and reduce the likelihood of interactions and side effects using computer modeling and improving information contained in drug labels.

Posted in Uncategorized by Rachel Mills
0 September 21, 2015

As we’ve posted about previously, new information is now available regarding the Precision Medicine Initiative, announced by President Obama earlier this year. On Thursday, an advisory committee presented a detailed program report to Francis Collins, director of the NIH. This report includes recommendations to create and manage a large research cohort, composed of at least 1 million participants. The report also details the many scientific opportunities that may be possible with a research project of this size and scope, and includes the potential to “identify the causes of individual variation in response to commonly used therapeutics (commonly referred to as pharmacogenomics).” The Precision Medicine Initiative is anticipated to enable focused research on pharmacogenomics within the first two years of the project. The press release from the NIH is available for review here. And the report is available in its entirety here.

Posted in Uncategorized by Rachel Mills
0 August 11, 2015

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new drug for the treatment of adults with schizophrenia and has included pharmacogenetic information on its label. Rexulti® (brexpiprazole)  has been evaluated in clinical trials and was shown to reduce the occurrence of symptoms of schizophrenia when compared to placebo. Rexulti® has also been approved as an add-on treatment for major depressive disorder and was shown to be effective as an add-on treatment in two clinical trials. The FDA-approved label includes drug interaction information recommending dosage changes for individuals who are known CYP2D6 poor metabolizers who are alsso taking medications that are strong/moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors. For more information, see the official press release from the FDA released July 13, 2015 and the approved drug label for Rexulti® .

Posted in Uncategorized by Rachel Mills